GlenColor Picture Profiles for the FS100 – version 1.2

After some more extensive testing and endless waveform gazing, here is my (hopefully last) PP receipt:

I ended up using two different PPs most of the time now.

UPDATE Glencolor PPs 1.2!
I just updated my PPs.

Glencolor1 is for general use, mainly indoor.
Glencolor2 is for outdoor – especially when sunny.

After more testing I removed the highlight protection, since it often produces ugly results, when you don´t have controlled light.
I also provide basic black levels now, if you have time to set your variable black level per scene, I recommend to do so.

GlenColor1:

Black Level: (basic) 0, (controlled = variable)
Gamma: Standard
Black Gamma: Range = High / Level = +7
Knee: Point = 80% / Slope = -1
Color Mode: Type = ITU709 / Level =8
Color Level: -4
Color Phase: -4

Color Depth: all 0

WB Shift = LB -3, cc -5
Detail = Level = -3 / Manual Set = on
V/H Ballance +2
BW Ballance Type3
Limit 7
Chrispening 0
Highlight Detail 0

GlenColor2

Black Level: (basic) -2, (controlled = variable)
Gamma: ITU709
Black Gamma: Range = High / Level = +7
Knee: Point = 80 / Slope = -2
Color Mode: Type = CinemaTone1 / Level =8
Color Level: -6
Color Phase: -4

Color Depth: R=-4, G=-0, B=-0, C=0, M=-4, Y=0
WB Shift = R-B   RGain-6. BGain 0

Detail = Level = -7 / Manual Set = on
V/H Ballance +2
BW Ballance Type3
Limit 7
Chrispening 0
Highlight Detail 0/blockquote>

What I do is:

1. Dialing in my DOF for the scene.
2. Correct the highlights with an variable ND, till the 100% zebras go away (or use a WFM).
3. bring the black levels to zero via the “Black Level” PP setting.

Number 3 is a bit awkward and time consuming, but the only way, to use as much of the 8 bit room as possible.
Believe me, it´s worth the fiddling in the menu. (for fast jobs or run&gun, I use one of the other presets, depending on if they go trough post or not.)

My further workflow goes like this:

Convert everything to Cineform (Film)
Drop them all in Premiere and start editing.
When I´m happy with the edit, I open first light and do the
primary CC in FirstLight – set “Linear” on in and output – maybe also apply a look (LUT) there.
If something special is needed, I also use Magic Bullet or Mojo in Premiere on top of everything.

Frank Glencairn

10 thoughts on “GlenColor Picture Profiles for the FS100 – version 1.2

  1. Hi Frank,

    I’m really happy with your GLog PP. it makes the FS100 Look like the 5d with the technicolor profile. Finally I can match these cameras very nice.

    There is one question I have regarding your other two profiles:

    how or where do you remove the highlight protection?
    I think that it’s just a translation problem for me.

    Thank’s for an answer.

    best regards,
    Gerald

    • Hi Frank,
      just sold my FS100 and upgraded to the F3 and was curious. For just for those times when I am not wanting to shoot s log for delivery speed, but only want what I can capture in camera on my cards, given that they share the same sensor, do you think these profile settings would work similarly for the F3?

  2. Pingback: New free G-LOG (S-LOGish) Picture Profiles for the SONY FS100 Version 1.0 « Frank Glencairn

  3. Don´t have a F3 here, but if you wait a bit, I make new PPs for the FS100 firmware upgrade, the gamma curves should be much closer now, so the could – sorta -work.

  4. Hey Frank,
    Am an editor and a times do CC/grading for a few of my projects. Recently I bought a Fs100 for me. I always keep telling my friends who play/work with the camera to shoot in some flat profile similar to what black magic uses to show RAW Wide Dynamic Range.
    http://www.blackmagicdesign.com/media/3768982/dynamicrange.jpg
    The Center Image. I checked your log profile, and none of them are as neutral as this.
    Just curious, is there a way to shoot something like this with FS 100, as with all the detail in the frame, and without a pref to a tone/color, it helps you grade better. Or am I just wrong??
    BTW great work..Keep it goin.
    Thanks
    Gitesh

    • I think the issue really lies in the fact that the Fs100 shoots in 8-bit 4:2:0 as opposed to theBMCC’s 4:4:4 12-Bit. If you go too flat with the fs100 and 4:2:0 8-bit, you will run into banding and artifacts when adding added contrast to the existing flat image.

  5. Pingback: Austin Mace – Clayton Anderson’s “Doin’ What You’re Doin” and Drew Baldridge’s “Whistlin’” Music Videos Wrap Production

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