Everything looks better on KODACHROME – K-Tone LUT

Many moons ago, I made a Profile for the FS100, that mimics (as good as possible) the look of vintage Kodachrome film. Now I made a LUT that does the same. I kind of “re-engineered”  the KODACHROME 828, daylight & Type A material, that was made from 1936 to 1962. This is the film that came out before the K-11 processing. It has a very nice “Vintage-Sweet-Home-Alabama-Look” to it, and gives you some very special red, yellow and blue tones. It also has a certain elegance and poetry to it that I really love. The K-TONE is a 3D cube LUT that plays nice wit most NLEs and color grading programs. The K-Tone LUT is expecting Log footage as input. 

Kodachrome was manufactured by Eastman Kodak from 1935 to 2009. Kodachrome was the first successfully mass-marketed color still film using a subtractive method, in contrast to earlier additive “screenplate” methods such as Autochrome and Dufaycolor, and remained the oldest brand of color film.

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Over its 74-year production, Kodachrome was produced in formats to suit various still and motion picture cameras, including 8mm, Super 8, 16mm, and 35mm for movies and 35mm, 120, 110, 126, 828, and large format for still photography. It was for many years used for professional color photography, especially for images intended for publication in print media.

kodachrome

Kodachrome is appreciated in the archival and professional market because of its color accuracy and dark-storage longevity. Because of these qualities, Kodachrome was used by professional photographers like Steve McCurry and Alex Webb. McCurry used Kodachrome for his well-known 1984 portrait of Sharbat Gula, the “Afghan Girl” for the National Geographic magazine.

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As digital photography progressively reduced the demand for film in the first decade of the 21st century, Kodachrome sales steadily declined. On June 22, 2009 Eastman Kodak Co. announced the end of Kodachrome production, citing declining demand. Many Kodak and independent laboratories once processed Kodachrome, but only one Kodak certified facility remained after the announcement: Dwayne’s Photo in Parsons, Kansas, where processing is scheduled to cease in December 2010. The final roll of 36-frame Kodachrome to be manufactured was tracked by National Geographic; it was shot by photographer Steve McCurry and processed by Dwayne’s Photo in July

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Kodachrome

They give us those nice bright colors
They give us the greens of summers
Makes you think all the world’s a sunny day, Oh yeah
I got a Nikon camera
I love to take a photograph
So mama don’t take my Kodachrome away

by Paul Simon

Download the K-TONE LUT

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